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Private Pesticide Applicator Responsibilities

Private pesticide applicators have responsibilities specific to their certification that they must adhere to as outlined in this document. Private Applicators, like all other applicators, are responsible to follow the pesticide label, handle pesticides safely, and report accidents.

Private pesticide applicators have responsibilities specific to their certification that they must adhere to as outlined in this document. Private Applicators, like all other applicators, are responsible to follow the pesticide label, handle pesticides safely, and report accidents. See Responsibilities of All Pesticide Applicators in Virginia for more information on these responsibilities.

 

I. Adhere to Certification Requirements

In Virginia, a private applicator is a person engaged in producing an agricultural commodity on private property (owned, rented, or leased by the producer). Growers using restricted-use pesticides must be certified or work under the direct supervision of a certified private applicator.

 

II. Supervise Uncertified Pesticide Users

Uncertified but competent persons may apply restricted-use pesticides in the production of agricultural commodities on private property when under the direct supervision of a certified private applicator. The certified private applicator is responsible for the actions of the uncertified person.

 

III. Keep Accurate Records

The Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade (FACT) Act, also known as the 1990 Farm Bill, requires certified private pesticide applicators to record applications of restricted-use pesticides (RUPs). Each RUP application made by a private applicator must be recorded within 14 days and records must be maintained for 2 years.

 

The nine elements required by the FACT Act are:

  1. Brand or product name.
  2. EPA registration number.
  3. Total amount of product used.
  4. Month, day, and year of application.
  5. Location of treated area.
  6. Crop, commodity, stored product, or site to which the restricted-use pesticide was applied.
  7. Size of area treated.
  8. The name of the certified private applicator who applied or supervised the application of the restricted-use pesticide.
  9. The certification number of the certified private applicator who applied or supervised the application of the restricted-use pesticide.

 

The Federal Worker Protection Standard (WPS) involves recordkeeping for growers who employ farm workers or pesticide handlers. WPS requires growers to make, maintain, and post pesticide application records as well as safety information in a central location. WPS application records must be kept for every pesticide used on the farm, not just for those that are restricted use, regardless of who applied the pesticide.

 

The six elements required by the WPS are:

  1. Brand or product name.
  2. EPA registration number.
  3. Active ingredient(s) in the product used.
  4. Location of treated area.
  5. Time and date the application is scheduled.
  6. Restricted-entry interval for the pesticide (duration and expiration).

 

See Private Applicator Recordkeeping Requirements for more information regarding private applicator recordkeeping and a sample recordkeeping form.

 

IV. Maintenance of Certification: Renewal and Recertification

A. Renewal

Private applicator certificates are automatically renewed by attending approved recertification courses and accumulating credits as described below. There is no fee. Private applicator certificates expire on December 31, two years following issue. Late renewals will not be accepted after March 1. A private applicator who allows his or her certificate to lapse must retest to become certified again.

 

B. Recertification

To qualify for renewal, all certified applicators must participate in an ongoing pesticide education (recertification) program. VA uses a credit system for private applicator recertification. Private Applicator recertification courses may be full-credit or part-credit. At a minimum, private applicators must accumulate three credits - one per content area - every two years in each category in which they're certified. The credit content areas are:

  • S = General Safety
  • L = Legal Responsibilities of Pesticide Users
  • P = Pest Management and Application Technology

 

Applicators may accumulate up to four years of recertification credit(s).

Most private applicator recertification courses are offered by Virginia Cooperative Extension. Program availability varies by time of year and by category. Not all approved programs will earn participants three different credits (safety, legal, and pest management/application technology) in both commonly-held private applicator categories (90=food/fiber and 91=ornamental production). Certified private applicators are advised to keep in touch with their local VCE agent to avoid missing recertification opportunities, and to confirm that the program they plan to attend will earn them the credits they need.

 

To receive updated certificates, certification status reports, and other communications from Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services / Office of Pesticide Services and program information from Virginia Cooperative Extension, certified private applicators must inform the VDACS OPS and their local Extension office if their mailing address changes.

 

See Private Pesticide Applicator Recertification Courses for a list of available courses in your area.

Document Actions
Private Applicator Forms

Private Applicator - Request to take exam at DMV [PDF] - not needed to take exam at Extension office.

Training - MANUALS

ORDER Virginia Certified Pesticide Applicator Training Manuals!

Training - Certification

Training options for those seeking certification as pesticide applicators in Virginia.

Training - Recertification
Consumer WARNING - Unregistered Pesticide Products!
Consumers should use caution when buying pest control products. EPA exempts a number of products called "25b" pesticides from registration. Many of these products lack sufficient safety and use information. Many are marketed with false and misleading claims. Avoid buying from door-to-door, online, or telephone sellers. When shopping in your local store, make sure any product you buy has a EPA Registration Number on the label. With bed bugs, brown-marmorated stinkbugs, mosquitoes, and Asian lady beetles affecting our daily lives, we are seeing more "snake-oil" products. If in doubt, contact your local Extension agent for assistance.
VTPP Consumer Newsletter

A newsletter for consumers with questions about pesticides in and around the home.  To view the issues, please click HERE.

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